Browse Author

Saurabh Vishnubhakat

Call for Papers: 8th International Conference on Information Law (ICIL)—Modern Intellectual Property Governance and “Openness” in Europe: A Long and Winding Road?

Call for Papers: 8th International Conference on Information Law (ICIL)—Modern Intellectual Property Governance and “Openness” in Europe: A Long and Winding Road?
Organized by the University of Antwerp (Research Group Government and Law) in collaboration with the Ionian University (Greece), the KU Leuven (CiTiP) and the University of Ghent

December 13–14, 2018
Research Group Government and Law
University of Antwerp
Antwerp, Belgium

Overview

  • Website:  https://icil.gr/2018/
  • Abstract submission deadline:  September 15, 2018
  • Abstract submission contact:  info@icil.gr
  • Notification of acceptances:  October 15, 2018
  • Full paper deadline:  January 15, 2019

Details

The last decade a trend towards more “openness” in terms of collaborations and access to knowledge can be observed in many different sectors and contexts. Along the spectrum of openness one can find many different varieties, such as open innovation, co-creation, open science (combined with open access and open data) and open source. Even traditionally rather “closed” actors, such as publishing houses and the pharmaceutical industry, are gradually catching up and are trying to develop mechanisms to cope with this trend towards openness.

Both public and private actors encounter challenges in combining this trend towards openness with the management of intellectual property rights (IPRs). Although a strong willingness may exist to collaborate, open up and share knowledge and data, IPRs often create boundaries and limitations towards cutting-edge collaborations and initiatives for openness and sharing. Over time companies, universities, public research organizations, etc. have developed certain models to allow for openness while safeguarding ways to protect their IPRs.

Yet, the legal framework is often lagging behind and does not appear to reflect the socio-economic trend towards openness; in many jurisdictions changes to IP legislation rather focusing on strengthening of rights of IP owners. But perhaps this is not necessarily a problem as stakeholders tend to find workarounds in their day-to-day practice.

Aim of the Conference

The conference aims to further the discussion about modern governance of IPRs in Europe and to explore different perspectives on how openness could be operationalized within the context of IP protection.

Topic of the Conference

The conference will examine the challenges of digitalization, collaboration, data sharing and innovation within the context of IP protection (incl. copyright protection, patents, trademarks, trade secrets, designs, etc.

The focus will be on Europe, but comparative perspectives are very welcome as well.

Suggested paper topics: access to information, access to knowledge, open innovation, co-creation, open source, open science, open access, open data, data sharing, Nagoya Protocol, artificial intelligence & IPRs, openness and blockchain technology (non-exhaustive list).

Organization of the Conference

The conference will consist of three main sessions with keynote speakers, reflection panels and discussion with the audience and four parallel sessions. For the parallel sessions a call will be launched end of Spring 2018. The deadline for abstracts will be just before summer and researchers will be informed end of August whether their abstract has been selected.

Who should participate?

Scholars from different disciplines (e.g. political sciences, law, economics, exact sciences) from all over the world are invited to discuss more theoretical/philosophical/conceptual work, empirical research and/or more doctrinal research.

For several parts of the program stakeholders will be invited, including industry representatives, policymakers, think tank researchers, technology transfer officers, etc. as a way to inform them, reflect together on key policy implications, engage all in the debate and translate (provisional) research to practice.

Keynote Speakers

  • Peter Drahos
  • Séverine Dusollier
  • Bernt Hugenholtz

Organizing Committee

  • Maria Botti, Ionian University (ICIL Representative)
  • Esther van Zimmeren & Nikos Koutras, University of Antwerp
  • Marie-Christine Janssens, KU Leuven
  • Hein Vanhees, University of Ghent/Antwerp

Call for Papers: Fourth International CLaw Workshop on Legal and Technical Issues in Cloud and Pervasive Computing (Singapore)

Call for Papers:  Fourth International CLaw Workshop on Legal and Technical Issues in Cloud and Pervasive Computing

October 8, 2018
Singapore
Co-located with Ubicomp and ISWC

Overview

Details

CLaw takes an interdisciplinary approach to explore the tech-legal challenges of emerging technologies.

We are moving towards realising the broader visions of ubiquitous and pervasive computing, such as smart cities that seamlessly support a vast range of applications. At the same time, we see technology subject to increasing public commentary, political scrutiny and regulatory attention.

As a result, existing (and proposed) regulatory and governance regimes place obligations on those who manage (process, use and collect) data; a high-profile example is the EU General Data Protection Regulation. In many cases, the end-users of applications have certain ‘rights’ that must be respected—and those developing, providing, offering and using technology bear various degrees of responsibility, which must be properly managed.

Managing these rights and responsibilities is becoming increasingly complex, both technically and legally. Many of the challenges stem from the increasingly, composite, automated, dynamic and often opaque nature of technology and its supporting ecosystems. The challenges are set to increase, as computing becomes increasingly pervasive and ubiquitous, and as visions of smart cities and the IoT become a reality.

Building on the successes of the previous workshops, CLaw 2018 aims to facilitate an interdisciplinary exploration of the technical and legal challenges as regards emerging technology, with a particular focus on its increasingly pervasive and ubiquitous nature.

The key goal of this workshop is to stimulate a multidisciplinary discussion and new directions on these important issues. As such, we welcome a wide range of submissions, whether technical, legal or thought pieces to stimulate debate. Note that for those technically-oriented—fully implemented and evaluated systems are not essential, and application-specific papers are welcome.

All accepted papers will be published in the ACM Digital Library.

Some suggested topics, in no particular order, include:

  • Considerations re the sensing/collection, storage and management of personal data
  • Technical approaches for managing legal obligations (privacy, user rights, SLAs, government access, …)
  • Accountability, audit and proof of compliance with regulation
  • Transparency in pervasive computing environments
  • Compatibility issues between regulation and technical implementation
  • The interplay of sensors, cloud, privacy and surveillance
  • Privacy and security in ubiquituous and cloud computing environments
  • Forensics and investigation (failures, security breaches)
  • Emerging cloud technologies (decentralised clouds: cloudlets, droplets; containment mechanisms)
  • Implications of fog and edge computing
  • Emerging cloud and infrastructure service models (X as a Service)
  • Issues relating to big data, analytics and machine learning
  • Data localisation: from centralisation to regional data stores (data stays in country X) to personal data stores (data stays at ‘home’) to micro-data stores (per-device).
  • Liability and safety aspects of automated systems and actuation
  • Encryption, security technologies and responsibility
  • Machine learning, profiling and analytics considerations
  • Distributed analytics and machine learning
  • Usability, interfaces, and the tech-legal implications
  • Fairness, anti-discrimination, human rights, privacy and power issues regarding emerging technology
  • Interaction between cloud and IoT and consumer-facing business models
  • Fairness, anti-discrimination, human rights, privacy and power issues regarding emerging technology
  • Application / sector specific considerations; e.g. wellness, healthcare, finance, law enforcement

Call for Papers: 2019 AALS Litigation Section Program—Artificial Intelligence and Litigation

Call for Papers: 2019 AALS Litigation Section Program—Artificial Intelligence and Litigation

AALS Annual Meeting
January 2–6, 2019
New Orleans, LA
Section on Litigation (program dates TBD)

Overview

  • Abstract/Paper submission deadline:  August 31, 2018
  • Abstract/Paper submission contact:  Andrew Bradt, abradt@law.berkeley.edu
  • Publication:  The Review of Litigation (University of Texas) will publish panel papers in a special symposium issue

Details

Artificial intelligence is rapidly altering the field of litigation. AI rooted technologies are increasingly utilized in fact gathering and strategic decision making. This program will discuss various technologies that are currently being utilized in litigation and suggestions as to other technologies that may soon appear in the marketplace. Further, the program will discuss the ethical and societal implications of AI influenced litigation, as well as the opportunities and challenges that law schools face in preparing graduates for a professional environment that will in no small part be shaped by AI.

Speakers

Andrew Bradt
Assistant Professor of Law
University of California, Berkeley, School of Law

Jamie E. Berry
Managing Director of Litigation Services
Integreon, Inc.

Joshua P. Davis
Professor of Law Director, Center for Law and Ethics; Dean’s Circle Scholar
University of San Francisco School of Law

Jeannette Eicks
Research Professor of Law; Co-Director, Center for Legal Innovation
Vermont Law School

Brian Kuhn, Esq.
Co-Founder and Leader of IBM Watson Legal Solutions
Partner, IBM Industry Platform

Presenter selected from CFP

Call for Papers

The Litigation Section is posting this call for papers. Persons interested in addressing matters that bear upon the subject of the program should submit draft papers or detailed abstracts by August 31, 2018, by emailing Section Chair-Elect Andrew Bradt at abradt@law.berkeley.edu. The selected author will present the paper at the Annual Meeting program. The Review of Litigation (University of Texas) will publish panel papers in a special symposium issue.

Call for Panelists: 2019 AALS Intellectual Property Program—The Realpolitik of IP

Call for Panelists: 2019 AALS Intellectual Property Program—The Realpolitik of IP

Sunday, January 6, 2019, 8:30am–10:15am
New Orleans, LA
AALS Annual Meeting
Section on Intellectual Property Law

Overview

  • Abstract submission deadline:  Friday, August 3, 2018
  • Notification of acceptancess:  Friday, August 31, 2018

Details

The AALS Section on Intellectual Property is pleased to invite faculty members to submit an abstract of a presentation on realpolitik in intellectual property. Those selected will present their research during a panel to be held as one part of the Section program at the 2019 AALS Annual Meeting in New Orleans. The panel, co-sponsored by AALS’s section on legislation & law of the political process, will take place at 8:30am on January 9, 2018.

The goal of this panel is to explore pragmatic considerations that influence the creation, debate, and implementation of intellectual property reform proposals into law, regulation, and policy. The panelists will address issues of political economy, legislative bargaining, executive branch agenda-setting, and implications for bilateral and multilateral coordination. The panel will be selected to address a range of topics across intellectual property from diverse viewpoints. In keeping with the 2019 Annual Meeting theme, Building Bridges, the Section’s executive committee hopes to make this panel a productive conversation about how competing visions and priorities in IP can result in social consensus.

Interested full-time faculty members of AALS member law schools are invited to submit an abstract (up to of one page) to Professor Guy Rub, Chair of the AALS Section on Intellectual Property, at rub.1@osu.edu by August 3, 2018. Selected presenters will be notified by August 31, 2018. The Committee plans to invite panelists from, but not exclusively from, those who respond to this call. Each panelist will be responsible for paying his/her annual meeting registration fee and other expenses.

Please direct questions to Professor Rub at rub.1@osu.edu or to Professor Ann Bartow, Chair-Elect of the AALS Section on Intellectual Property, at ann.bartow@law.unh.edu.

Call for Panelists: 2019 AALS Intellectual Property Program—IP Exhaustion and Post-Sale Restrictions

Call for Panelists: 2019 AALS Intellectual Property Program—IP Exhaustion and Post-Sale Restrictions

Friday, January 4, 2019, 10:30am–12:15pm
New Orleans, LA
AALS Annual Meeting
Section on Intellectual Property Law

Overview

  • Abstract submission deadline:  Friday, August 3, 2018
  • Notification of acceptancess:  Friday, August 31, 2018

Details

The AALS Section on Intellectual Property is pleased to invite faculty members to submit an abstract of a presentation on IP exhaustion and post-sale restrictions. Those selected will present their research during a panel to be held as part of the section program at the 2019 AALS Annual Meeting in New Orleans. The panel will take place on Friday, January 4, 2019 at 10:30. IP exhaustion has been heavily litigated in recent years including twice in the past five years before the Supreme Court: Kirtsaeng v. John Wiley & Sons in 2012 and Impression Products v. Lexmark International in 2017.

The goal of this panel is to explore the open questions, challenges, and opportunity, following those decisions. Indeed, the decisions settled some open questions, including by establishing an international exhaustion regime in both copyright law and patent law. However, many related questions were left unanswered, especially concerning the ability of IP right-holders to establish and enforce post-sale restrictions notwithstanding the principles of exhaustion. Such open questions include, for example, what restrictions can be imposed by establishing licensing or lending arrangements instead of sales, and how courts should distinguish those transactions? To what degree other legal tools, such as contracts law or private property law, can be used to establish post-sale restrictions? Can trademark law restrict grey-market importation, now that copyright and patent law cannot? How, if at all, should exhaustion be applied in the digital space? The panel will be selected to address those and other questions across intellectual property law from diverse viewpoints.

Interested full-time faculty members of AALS member law schools are invited to submit an abstract (up to of one page) to Professor Guy Rub, Chair of the AALS Section on Intellectual Property, at rub.1@osu.edu by August 3, 2018. Selected presenters will be notified by August 31, 2018. The Committee plans to invite panelists from, but not exclusively from, those who respond to this call. Each panelist will be responsible for paying his/her annual meeting registration fee and other expenses.

Please direct questions to Professor Rub at rub.1@osu.edu or to Professor Ann Bartow, Chair-Elect of the AALS Section on Intellectual Property, at ann.bartow@law.unh.edu.

Call for Papers: 2019 AALS Internet & Computer Law Program—Cyborgs and the Law

Call for Papers: 2019 AALS Internet & Computer Law Program—Cyborgs and the Law

AALS Annual Meeting
January 2–6, 2019
New Orleans, LA
Section on Internet and Computer Law (program dates TBD)

Overview

  • Paper submission deadline:  Friday, August 10, 2018
  • Paper submission contact:  Christina Mulligan, christina.mulligan@brooklaw.edu
  • Notification of acceptances:  Friday, September 7, 2018

Details

The Section on Internet and Computer Law is pleased to announce a Call for Papers from which one additional presenter will be selected for the section’s program on The Internet of Bodies: Cyborgs and the Law, to be held during the AALS 2019 Annual Meeting in New Orleans in January 2019.

Panel topic description

Forget networked toasters — Internet-connected devices are increasingly being integrated into human bodies, for medical, experimental, and expressive purposes. How will the legal issues surrounding the “Internet of Bodies” differ from the “Internet of Things”? How should regulatory agencies approach these phenomena? What inspires people to “hack” their own bodies? These issues and more will be explored by a diverse panel of legal and non-legal scholars.

Form and length of submission

The paper may be anywhere from 10,000 words to 35,000 words, including text and footnotes, with a preference for papers under 20,000 words in length. It should be a law review article or symposium piece.

Submission method and due date

Papers should be submitted electronically to Christina Mulligan at christina.mulligan@brooklaw.edu. The due date for submission is Friday, August 10, 2018.

Submission review:

Papers will be selected after review by members of the Executive Committee of the Section. The author of the selected paper will be notified by Friday, September 7, 2018. Call for Paper presenters (like other law school panelists) will be responsible for paying their registration fee and hotel and travel expenses.

Call for Papers: 2018 SOLAIR Conference: Society, Law, Artificial Intelligence, and Robotics (Czech Academy of Sciences)

2018 SOLAIR Conference: International Harmonization of Private Law with Regard to Artificial Intelligence and Intelligent Autonomous Robotics

September 5–6, 2018
Czech Academy of Sciences
Národní 3, Prague, Czech Republic

Overview

  • Website:  http://solairconference.com/
  • Abstract Submission:  http://solairconference.com/abstract-submission/
  • Abstract Deadline:  August 1, 2018
  • Notification of Acceptance:  August 10, 2018
  • Final Paper Deadline:  September 20, 2018
  • Fees:  The conference fee is 1.500,- CZK (approximately 60 EUR or 70 USD) for both speakers and delegates. The conference fee includes participation at all panels, coffee-lunch buffets and conference materials. The fee does not cover travel and accommodation. Participants need to make self-arrangements.

Details

Artificial Intelligence (AI) and intelligent autonomous robotics represent current trends in innovation that start to pervade our lives. Characteristics of intelligent autonomous software and machines, such as decrease or even absence of human control over certain processes, inexplicability of automated decisions as well as their unpredictability to a certain degree, pose specific challenges to law. Given the widespread use of these technologies, experts from various countries have already started discussions on adapting laws on national levels. A world-wide discussion is needed in order to guide a safe and responsible use of these technologies. The aim of this conference is to facilitate a discussion on how harmonized legal rules can promote trust and acceptance of AI and intelligent autonomous robotics in the society. The conference discussions should reflect on issues outlined in the Proposal submitted by the Czech Republic on artificial intelligence that was discussed during the 97th session of the UNIDROIT Governing Council and will be discussed during the 51st session of the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (A/CN.9/960).

We seek abstracts of papers focused on the legal issues related to AI and intelligent autonomous robotics namely, but not limited to, in the areas of liability (both contracts and torts), due diligence, consumer protection, competition law, protection of personal rights and privacy, intellectual property issues, commercial transactions, employment law, cybersecurity, and the very status of AI/intelligent autonomous robots. Contributions containing international comparative analysis are highly welcome.

The conference should bring together academics as well as official representatives of states and form a basis for future work in the area of international harmonization of private law. Presented papers should provide an initial analysis of respective issues. We presume publication of conference papers based on an accepted and presented abstract after the conference by the end of 2018 in the form of an open access e-book. Final papers are due after the conference in order to enable authors to benefit from the discussions during the conference.

Contact

Technology Policy Institute: Quantifying the Digital Revolution

Quantifying the Digital Revolution

Thursday, July 12, 2018 12:00–2:30pm
The City Club of Washington
555 13th Street, NW
Washington, DC 20004

Overview

Details

The Digital Revolution and the proliferation of digital economy goods and services have been truly astonishing. However, what seems evident in daily life is not reflected in the nation’s GDP statistics. The value of “free goods” companies like Google, Facebook, and Amazon produce is not included in GDP, which understates their contribution to economic welfare. As a result, true economic growth is also understated and the rate of inflation overstated. Policy makers rely on these important indicators to formulate monetary and fiscal policy.

New research by Charles Hulten and Leonard Nakamura addresses this issue, explaining that many of the benefits of the information available over the internet are targeted directly at consumers and therefore bypass GDP. Thus, conventional measures of GDP miss much of the consumer welfare created by such technological innovations.

Join the Technology Policy Institute and a panel of experts to discuss these and other new ideas aimed at quantifying the digital revolution.

Confirmed panelists include:

  • Ana Aizcorbe, Senior Research Economist, US Bureau of Economic Analysis
  • Carol Corrado, Senior Advisor and Research Director, Economics Program, The Conference Board
  • Shane Greenstein, Martin Marshall Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School
  • Charles Hulten, Professor Emeritus of Economics, University of Maryland, and Adjunct Senior Fellow, Technology Policy Institute
  • Leonard Nakamura, Vice President and Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia

Register today to attend!

 

Call for Submissions: Second Northeast Privacy Scholars Workshop (Fordham Law)

Second Northeast Privacy Scholars Workshop

November 9, 2018
Fordham University School of Law
150 West 62nd Street
New York, NY 10023

Overview

Details

Jointly organized by the Innovation Center for Law and Technology at New York Law School and the Center for Law and Information Policy at Fordham Law School, and generously sponsored by Microsoft, the Workshop offers privacy scholars from diverse fields the opportunity to receive extensive and detailed constructive commentary on their works in progress.

We invite submissions on a variety of privacy-related topics from a wide range of disciplines, including, but not limited to, law, social science, computer science, engineering, communications, and public policy.

The Workshop format is designed to facilitate discussion and commentary on early stage papers, or papers that can benefit from substantial feedback. Therefore, we will give preference to papers that are sufficiently developed to be read and critiqued, but not yet submitted for publication. There will be no presentations at the Workshop; rather, only brief commentary from a lead commentator and feedback from participants. All participants and attendees are asked to read the papers ahead of time and stay for the entire Workshop.

We ask all prospective participants — whether you are submitting a paper, volunteering to serve as a commentator, or hoping to attend as an active participant (limited availability) — to complete the online submission form.

Program Committee

  • Arvind Narayanan, Princeton University, Department of Computer Science
  • Helen Nissenbaum, NYU Steinhardt and Cornell Tech
  • Frank Pasquale, University of Maryland, Francis King Carey School of Law
  • Joel R. Reidenberg, Fordham University School of Law (co-Chair)
  • Kathy Strandburg, NYU School of Law
  • Joe Turow, University of Pennsylvania, Annenberg School for Communication
  • Ari Ezra Waldman, New York Law School (co-Chair)

If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Ari at ari.waldman@nyls.edu.

CFP: Conference on Limitations on Trademark Rights

Call for Papers: Limitations on Trademark Rights from Comparative and Interdisciplinary Perspectives
Co-organized by the University of Hong Kong Faculty of Law and the NYU School of Law

January 7–8, 2019
Law and Technology Center
University of Hong Kong Faculty of Law

Overview

Details

The Law and Technology Center at the University of Hong Kong Faculty of Law and the Engelberg Center on Innovation Law & Policy at New York University School of Law will next year co-sponsor a conference on limitations on trademark rights. The conference will bring together scholars from around the world to explore the nature and scope of those limitations from comparative and interdisciplinary perspectives. The conference will be held at the University of Hong Kong on January 7-8, 2019.

The Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) sets no minimum standards for limitations on trademark rights, such as fair use and exhaustion. At the domestic level, the courts in various jurisdictions have adopted conflicting opinions on how to decide cases involving such limitations  (e.g., nominative fair use). Comparative studies are therefore useful in understanding the differing legal standards for the limitations on trademark rights adopted in different jurisdictions. Moreover, conventional wisdom largely justifies trademark rights limitations from free speech or market competition perspectives, with other theoretical approaches such as social and cultural studies enjoying limited application in considering the nature and scope of those limitations. Against this backdrop, the conference organizers welcome submissions of papers developing new thoughts and theories on limitations on trademark rights by examining them through a comparative or interdisciplinary lens.

The Rt. Hon. Professor Sir Robin Jacob will deliver the conference’s keynote speech, and a number of leading trademark scholars have already agreed to present papers. A limited number of presentation slots have also been reserved for scholars to be selected through this call for papers. Both senior and junior scholars are encouraged to submit abstracts of the papers they intend to present. Abstracts will be selected based on scholarly merit and originality.

Please submit an abstract (no more than 300 words) to Ms. Grace Chan at mcgrace@hku.hk by September 14, 2018. The submission should also include your name, position, institutional affiliation and e-mail address.

All applicants will be informed of the selection outcome by October 2, 2018. Financial support is available for scholars who experience difficulty obtaining a sufficient travel grant from their institution.

All conference enquiries should be addressed to Ms. Grace Chan at the above e-mail address or at (+852) 3917-4727.